Wednesday, March 11, 2009

The Northome Stone Arch

Northome Stone Arch
Built for R. M. Bennet and E. Clifford, early Northome residents.
Northome's entrance had a double arch when it was built early in the 1900s. The left arch was taken down in 1925 to accomodate trucks. (from the book "Pictureque Deephaven")
I took this photo on a gray and dreary March day, but later in Spring and Summer, when the trees and plants are in full bloom, it is difficult to see the whole structure.
Deephaven street sign

5 Comments:

Anonymous Sally said...

I live in the area and have always loved the arch. Since you seem to be a local history buff, any ideas on what the random fieldstone posts along Deephaven Ave and Highland were for? I have one in an odd place in my backyard.

Love your Blog!

2:33 PM  
Blogger minnetonkafelix said...

Sally,

I believe that the feildstone posts were survey markers for the early parceling of land. I am sure many are decorative also. But in my lot we have some still standing and they were corner survey markers.

5:32 AM  
Anonymous Sally said...

That would make sense, since my house was built in 1910 and the post is close to the back lot line, but not on the current corner. Think it could be moved? It would make a great base for a bird bath!

Thanks for the info!

7:30 AM  
Blogger BURTSCHER said...

Bonjour, j'écris une petite histoire qui a comme ''décors'' la ville de Northome.

Pouvez-vous me dire à quelle dat à été construite cette arche?

Cordialement,

Eric

Hello, I write the short history which takes place in the city of Northome.

Can you say to me in which dat in summer built this arc?

Best Regards,

Eric

7:11 AM  
Anonymous Lisa said...

Actually, the arch was built in the 1870-80s as the entrance to Charles Gibson’s “Northome.” It was always a single arch, but the left “fence” portion was removed to make way for a second lane. There are early photos of it in its original state at the Excelsior-Lake Minnetonka Historical Society. Articles about Gibson, “Northome” and the arch can be found in early issues of the “Minneapolis Tribune.”

3:34 PM  

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